Muslim Countries Angry at Trump Travel ban

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President Donald Trump’s executive orders that have seen temporary travel bans on refugees and travellers from predominantly Muslim countries such as Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia has faced international condemnation.

Through the U.S widespread chaos and protest have ensued as passengers have been detained even if they had valid travel documents.

Throughout the affected countries, many have responded with anger and rage.

“Gift to Extremists”

Iran has warned that the ban will aid terrorist recruitment with foreign minister Javad Zarif tweeting that it was a gift to extremists.  They warned that they would be taking reciprocal measures on all American passport holders.

Sudan

Sudan which has recently seen better relations with the U.S after helping them combat terrorism and in return seeing sanctions lifted, said in a statement, “It is particularly unfortunate that this decision coincides with the two countries’ historic move to lift economic and trade sanctions … and just as economic and financial institutions as well as businessmen in the country were set to continue developing their investment projects.”

Iraq

The Iraq government said it understood the idea behind the sanctions but felt it should have special treatment given the special relationship that has developed with the U.S.  Iraq’s troops are often in frontline action on behalf of the U.S.

Although the government’s official line is not to put in place a reciprocal agreement many in the Iraqi parliament feel they should.

Syria

So far nearly five million people have been displaced through the ongoing fighting that is in part backed by the U.S.  The suspension of America’s Syrian refugee resettlement programme has brought dismay to the United Nations as it was “described as the most important in the world.”

The International Organisation for Migration urged him to reconsider the four-month hold on refugees but like the safe zones did not come to pass.

The Trump administration said the bans may be extended and become more far-reaching in the near future.

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